What alternative grains are there?

  • Wild Rice

    Wild rice is not actually from the rice family. It is a grass and can be mixed with regular rice to add a nutty flavor. It contains protein, dietary fiber, magnesium, niacin, phosphorus, potassium, and zinc.
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  • Teff

    Teff is from Ethiopia where it is used to make a bread called Injera. Usually, only teff flour is used, but be cautious if ordering Injera in a restaurant. In North America, teff flour is usually combined with wheat flour to make Injera. Always ask. It is available as whole grain or flour. The whole […]
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  • Sorghum

    Sorghum is from Africa. It is available in whole grain, grits, or flour. And it is even available as beer. The whole grain can be used as side dish, stuffing, etc. The grits can be eaten as a hot cereal. Sorghum flour mixed with other gluten-free flours is used in baking. It contains protein, dietary […]
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  • Quinoa

    This grain comes from South American. It is called a supergrain due to its nutritional content. It has a nutty flavor. The seeds grow with a bitter coating that must be removed before eating, but most companies already remove it before selling, so it should be ready for cooking when you buy it. It comes […]
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  • Montina

    Actually Indian ricegrass (not actually a rice), it is grown by Amazing Grains Grower Cooperative. It is processed in a gluten-free facility and is tested using the R5 ELISA test. Sold as 100% pure Montina flour and as a baking flour blend with white rice flour and tapioca flour. It contains protein, fiber, calcium, and […]
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  • Millet

    It has a corn-like, slightly nutty flavor. The whole grain is used for hot cereal, side dishes, stuffing, or in a salad. Puffed millet can be eaten as a cold cereal. It can be combined with other gluten-free flours and used for baking. Millet flour can become rancid easily, so only buy what you will […]
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  • Mesquite

    Although it is mostly known for the wood chips from the trees that are used to grill with, the mesquite trees actually have bean pods that are used for foods. It can be ground into flour and combined with other gluten-free flours for cooking and baking things such as pancakes, breads, brownies, cookies, etc. It […]
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  • Flax

    Flax comes as an oil, whole seed, or ground. It is full of great nutrients, but they are only released if the seed is broken, so grinding ensures the nutrients are absorbed. The fat in flax goes rancid quickly, so grind it as you need it. If ground or oil, store in refrigerator and in […]
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  • Buckwheat

    Although it has “wheat” in the name, it is not related to wheat. It got its name because it used in the same way as wheat. It has an outer shell, but the inside kernel is called a groat. It also has a nutty flavor. When the kernels are roasted they are called kasha. It […]
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  • Amaranth

    Amaranth was used by the Aztecs. It has a nutty flavor and goes well in porridge type dishes. Amaranth flour is used for bread. It contains protein, dietary fiber, B vitamins, calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, and zinc.
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